Monthly Archives: April 2011

★ Kindergarten iPad 2 program causes rift between parents and school officials in Maine

Link: Kindergarten iPad 2 program causes rift between parents and school officials in Maine

The group questions the effect of handing iPads to children who are not ready for the technology and objects to the use of taxpayer money to fund this experimental program.

I would question it to, it’s not that I don’t think young children cannot handle the technology leap it’s that I think they would potentially miss out on some very important fundamentals, ie. handwriting, drawing, finger painting, etc.

I didn’t start using a computer regularly till my early 20’s, I’m now 35, and my handwriting has become steadily worse and worse since I started writing less and less.

Whilst I think the technology is important, I think more importance should be given to the fundamentals.

★ Kindergarten iPad 2 program causes rift between parents and school officials in Maine

Link: Kindergarten iPad 2 program causes rift between parents and school officials in Maine

The group questions the effect of handing iPads to children who are not ready for the technology and objects to the use of taxpayer money to fund this experimental program.

I would question it to, it’s not that I don’t think young children cannot handle the technology leap it’s that I think they would potentially miss out on some very important fundamentals, ie. handwriting, drawing, finger painting, etc.

I didn’t start using a computer regularly till my early 20’s, I’m now 35, and my handwriting has become steadily worse and worse since I started writing less and less.

Whilst I think the technology is important, I think more importance should be given to the fundamentals.

★ Shaking up the bizarre habits ingrained in primary health care – (37signals)

Link: Shaking up the bizarre habits ingrained in primary health care – (37signals)

It’s crazy that actually being able to email your doctor is still so unusual in this day and age. It’s one of the many ‘bizarre habits that have been ingrained’ in the world of primary care…

Some interesting movements in the healthcare industry. I think ease of access is one thing that stops a lot of men going to the doctor, among a myriad of other reasons, and I for one would love to be able to flick a quick email over to my Doctor with an update or asking a quick bit of advice.

One of the companies we, my 9-5 job, have started working with has some very interesting products that make this sort of thing a bit more viable in that they are personal monitoring products where your datas are recorded, uploaded without the need for user intervention, and can be subscribed to by your physician. It’s pretty cool technology, though not remarkably new or ‘out there’, but the application is still something very new in the healthcare industry.

★ Shaking up the bizarre habits ingrained in primary health care – (37signals)

Link: Shaking up the bizarre habits ingrained in primary health care – (37signals)

It’s crazy that actually being able to email your doctor is still so unusual in this day and age. It’s one of the many ‘bizarre habits that have been ingrained’ in the world of primary care…

Some interesting movements in the healthcare industry. I think ease of access is one thing that stops a lot of men going to the doctor, among a myriad of other reasons, and I for one would love to be able to flick a quick email over to my Doctor with an update or asking a quick bit of advice.

One of the companies we, my 9-5 job, have started working with has some very interesting products that make this sort of thing a bit more viable in that they are personal monitoring products where your datas are recorded, uploaded without the need for user intervention, and can be subscribed to by your physician. It’s pretty cool technology, though not remarkably new or ‘out there’, but the application is still something very new in the healthcare industry.

★ Daring Fireball: Andy Ihnatko Reviews the BlackBerry PlayBook and LG G-Slate

Link: Daring Fireball Linked List: Andy Ihnatko Reviews the BlackBerry PlayBook and LG G-Slate:

But down this path, we’d never get rid of Flash. The baseline experience for online video would forever remain crashy, lesser-quality, less-power-efficient, insecure, and in the total control of a single company — Adobe — that has shown itself to be incapable of addressing any of these problems.

And that’s why we, and Apple, need to keep pushing the ‘flash is bad’ line.

★ Daring Fireball: Andy Ihnatko Reviews the BlackBerry PlayBook and LG G-Slate

Link: Daring Fireball Linked List: Andy Ihnatko Reviews the BlackBerry PlayBook and LG G-Slate:

But down this path, we’d never get rid of Flash. The baseline experience for online video would forever remain crashy, lesser-quality, less-power-efficient, insecure, and in the total control of a single company — Adobe — that has shown itself to be incapable of addressing any of these problems.

And that’s why we, and Apple, need to keep pushing the ‘flash is bad’ line.

★ iPhoneTracker @ GitHub

Link: iPhone Tracker application on GitHub

This open-source application maps the information that your iPhone is recording about your movements. It doesn’t record anything itself, it only displays files that are already hidden on your computer.

This whole thing will be, and is already in some parts of the media, getting blown out of all proportion. All phones collect this data, the difference is that someone at Apple in the iPhone development team forgot to put in the extra line of code that only keeps X number of entries.

My guess is that in the next iOS update, or more likely an iTunes update, there will be some script added to delete old data.

It’s really no big deal, and I doubt Apple is doing anything nefarious with this information (specially considering they have no access to it), but the fact of the matter is they’ve been very silent about the issue and that can damage a weaker brand.

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★ iPhoneTracker @ GitHub

Link: iPhone Tracker application on GitHub

This open-source application maps the information that your iPhone is recording about your movements. It doesn’t record anything itself, it only displays files that are already hidden on your computer.

This whole thing will be, and is already in some parts of the media, getting blown out of all proportion. All phones collect this data, the difference is that someone at Apple in the iPhone development team forgot to put in the extra line of code that only keeps X number of entries.

My guess is that in the next iOS update, or more likely an iTunes update, there will be some script added to delete old data.

It’s really no big deal, and I doubt Apple is doing anything nefarious with this information (specially considering they have no access to it), but the fact of the matter is they’ve been very silent about the issue and that can damage a weaker brand.

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★ Fixing Google Reader's unstar problem

Every now and then Google Reader has a quirky bug that stops you from being able to un-star an article in your Starred Items list, also known as the “permastar” issue. It’s a pain in the ass, particularly when you use your Starred Items list as an indicator of things you’re still needing to read or blog about.

Recently I had an article by Marco Arment stuck in my Google Reader’s Starred Items list and no matter where I un-starred it, Google Reader, Reeder iOS, or Reeder on my MacBook Air, it remained in the list. Arggh!

It seems Google is aware of the problem but doesn’t have a fix for it. Well anyway, I worked out how to fix it…at least it worked for me.

In Google Reader un-subscribe from the offending feed, then in your Starred Items list just un-star the offending article. Simply re-subscribe to the feed to continue receiving that sites future posting. Voila. Fixed. Simple.

★ Fixing Google Reader’s unstar problem

Every now and then Google Reader has a quirky bug that stops you from being able to un-star an article in your Starred Items list, also known as the “permastar” issue. It’s a pain in the ass, particularly when you use your Starred Items list as an indicator of things you’re still needing to read or blog about.

Recently I had an article by Marco Arment stuck in my Google Reader’s Starred Items list and no matter where I un-starred it, Google Reader, Reeder iOS, or Reeder on my MacBook Air, it remained in the list. Arggh!

It seems Google is aware of the problem but doesn’t have a fix for it. Well anyway, I worked out how to fix it…at least it worked for me.

In Google Reader un-subscribe from the offending feed, then in your Starred Items list just un-star the offending article. Simply re-subscribe to the feed to continue receiving that sites future posting. Voila. Fixed. Simple.

Fixing Google Reader’s unstar problem

Every now and then Google Reader has a quirky bug that stops you from being able to un-star an article in your Starred Items list, also known as the “permastar” issue. It’s a pain in the ass, particularly when you use your Starred Items list as an indicator of things you’re still needing to read or blog about.

Recently I had an article by Marco Arment stuck in my Google Reader’s Starred Items list and no matter where I un-starred it, Google Reader, Reeder iOS, or Reeder on my MacBook Air, it remained in the list. Arggh!

It seems Google is aware of the problem but doesn’t have a fix for it. Well anyway, I worked out how to fix it…at least it worked for me.

In Google Reader un-subscribe from the offending feed, then in your Starred Items list just un-star the offending article. Simply re-subscribe to the feed to continue receiving that sites future posting. Voila. Fixed. Simple.

Fixing Google Reader's unstar problem

Every now and then Google Reader has a quirky bug that stops you from being able to un-star an article in your Starred Items list, also known as the “permastar” issue. It’s a pain in the ass, particularly when you use your Starred Items list as an indicator of things you’re still needing to read or blog about.

Recently I had an article by Marco Arment stuck in my Google Reader’s Starred Items list and no matter where I un-starred it, Google Reader, Reeder iOS, or Reeder on my MacBook Air, it remained in the list. Arggh!

It seems Google is aware of the problem but doesn’t have a fix for it. Well anyway, I worked out how to fix it…at least it worked for me.

In Google Reader un-subscribe from the offending feed, then in your Starred Items list just un-star the offending article. Simply re-subscribe to the feed to continue receiving that sites future posting. Voila. Fixed. Simple.

★ People I would hire if I had the opportunity, @lexiphanic

If I’m ever in a position to hire a community manager I already know who I would go out of my way to hire, this guy.

Have a squiz at this series of articles Greg has just started (and that I’m now making him accountable for), now that’s what I call quality.

Tweet the heck out of them, send them all to Instapaper, or at least make sure you read them;

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★ People I would hire if I had the opportunity, @lexiphanic

If I’m ever in a position to hire a community manager I already know who I would go out of my way to hire, this guy.

Have a squiz at this series of articles Greg has just started (and that I’m now making him accountable for), now that’s what I call quality.

Tweet the heck out of them, send them all to Instapaper, or at least make sure you read them;

window.onload = function(){var div = document.getElementById(‘contentdiv’),oldscroll = 0;div.scrollTop = oldscroll;}